Cheese and Onion Courgette Bread


IMG_2389Continuing with the courgette baking theme, but this time with a savoury option.  This is a lovely loaf to eat on it’s own, with salads or as I’m doing right now, dunking in a bowl of freshly made Bolognese sauce.

The lumps of cheese make a nice feature and work really well with the sprint onions, whilst the courgette ensures that the loaf stays moist.

The courgette makes this a very wet dough, so you have 2 options.  The one here gets the mess out of the way but commits you to using a mixer and dough hook.  If you want to make the loaf by hand work in the cheese, onion and courgette after the initial proving

Ingredients

  • plenty of Olive Oil
  • 350g Strong White Flour
  • 150g Stoneground Wholemeal Bread Flour
  • 8g Salt
  • 10g Fast Action Yeast
  • 330ml Water
  • 250g Courgette, grated
  • 150g Cheddar Cheese – half grated, half broken into lumps
  • 5 Spring Onions, chopped

Method

  • Start by taking the grated courgette and wrapping in a tea towel. Leave somewhere to allow the moisture to drain away
  • In a mixing bowl add the flours, salt and yeast then add in most of the water and 3 tbsp Oil
  • Use a electric mixer to start to bring the dough together, adding extra water as required
  • Squeeze out the moisture from the courgette and add to the dough, along with the cheese and onions
  • Continue to work with a dough hook until the well kneaded
  • Turn into an oiled bowl and cover with cling film. Set aside to prove until doubled in size
  • Tip the dough onto a floured surface and knock back.  Shape into 2 loafs and place in oiled tins to rise, dusting with a little flour or semolina and coving again with clingfilm
  • Cook in a preheated oven, 210oC for about 25-30 minutes

 

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Sophie33 says:

    I lade this fantastic bread too but used less SALT in here though!
    Very Yum Yum! 😉

    1. Of course it’s a matter of taste, and I’ve cut the amount of salt down in this recipe because of the cheese. In a plain loaf I’d normally use 9-10g and I’ve used as little as 7g per 500g flour before, but less than this I find the balance isn’t right for me. Too much salt isn’t great either, and it can deactivate the yeast!

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